Running Rabbit Pattern

A winsome little rabbit wandering through a meadow of wildflowers makes for a lovely little wall hanging. It’s very easy to create too!

  1. Collect your supplies as follows:
  • Print RunningRabbitPattern
  • 10” X 6” piece of fabric for rabbit (I used Liberty of London)
  • 11″ X 16″ piece of background fabric (I used a soft blue linen)
  • 11″ X 16″ piece of backing fabric (I used cotton muslin)
  • Scraps of fabric for flowers
  • Buttons for flower centers
  • Thread to match or compliment fabrics (one that matches the rabbit, and different shades of green for the grass).
  • Scissors
  • Embroidery floss for details on the rabbit and butterflies.
  • A sewing needle and an embroidery needle
  • Four stretcher bars – two 9 inch bars, and two 14 inch bars
  • Glue and staples for stretcher bars
  • Ruler
  • Tailor’s chalk

NOTE: pre-wash all fabric before sewing and final washing so they all shrink at the same rate.

  1. Cut two layers of fabric (muslin backing and background fabric of your choice). These should be 11 inches by 16 inches so there is a 2 inch overlap to wrap around the stretcher bars. The photo below shows the two fabrics, plus a pink chalk line that marks the part of the fabric that will be the front of your piece…the rest will wrap around the sides of the stretcher bars.

3. Sew along the entire edge of your fabric approximately 1/2 inch from the edge.

  1. Place the bottom edge of your fabric in the machine to start sewing on the grass. Just go up to where you want the grass to stop, and with the needle in the down position, rotate your fabric and sew back down towards the bottom edge. Just sew up and down like this in a random pattern to create your first grass line. I like to use at least three colors of green thread for this, but you could use more or less depending on your personal preference. For grass height, I like to sew to the middle of the background fabric and up to 2/3 of the way up towards the top of the fabric (don’t forget to use sew the grass onto the long edge of the fabric). I sew the grass at random heights to make it look more wild and natural. This is completely a matter of personal choice. I prefer tall grass, but you might prefer shorter grass, or even taller grass.

  1. Position the rabbit in the center of the fabric or thereabouts. It should cover some of the grass. Then sew around the outside edge of the rabbit (1/4″ seam). I do not applique or finish the outside edge, but you can if you like. I prefer rough unfinished edges.

  1. Choose your favorite green thread and sew more grass lines along the body of the rabbit, so it looks like it’s running through the grass. Again, add as much or as little grass as you like.

  1. Use your chalk to create an outline where some of the details on the rabbit are. This is optional, but adds dimension. All of the lines are drawn on the pattern.

  1. Here you have another option…you can use a narrow zig-zag machine stitch to highlight the details, or you can stretch the fabric on the stretcher bars and embroider the lines with a split stitch. Use embroidery floss to hand stitch the center of the eye either way. Also, you can follow the outside contours of the entire rabbit with the floss or a zig-zag stitch, or leave the edge open…I leave mine open.

  1. If you have used chalk, you’ll want to wash the entire piece of fabric now. This will create the ruff edges that I like so much as well. Then iron your fabric before attaching it to stretcher boards.

10. Stretch your rabbit onto stretcher bars. I didn’t create a tutorial for this, but there are many out there. Here is one from Wiki How…just leave out wetting the canvas, and finishing the canvas….Stretching Canvas.

Part Two – Flowers

  1. Collect your fabric scraps and cut our a variety of circles in different fabrics. You can use jars, spools, lids, buttons, or other round objects to create the circles. You can also decide how large you want your circles to be. Mine are 3/4 inch to 2 inches in diameter.

2. Cut little ‘V’ shaped notches out around the edge of your circle. These can be completely random.

3. Layer your circles any way you want. Make sure you have cut many circles in a variety of diameters.

4. Match some buttons to your circles, but don’t sew them on just yet. Save all of your extra flowers though. They come in handy for small brooches and decorations on other sewing projects, like headbands, purses, garlands, etc.

5. Sew the flowers onto the front of your running rabbit art…play with layout and flowers sizes. I try to place them at the top of the grass, with a few scattered around the center and lower grass.

Part Three

Add little butterflies to the ‘sky’ area above the rabbit or around the grass area. Just use the pattern to cut out little butterfly shapes. I like to layer two pieces together. Then use embroidery floss to attach the center of the butterfly to your rabbit art. This also creates a ‘body’ for the butterfly. Use thread or one strand of floss to create antennae as desired.

You’re done! You can get super creative with this and add all kinds of insects to the grass or sky. You could decrease the pattern and make a momma and baby rabbits running together. You can use any fabric combinations…I used a solid ground and patterned rabbit (like this one), or go the opposite way and use a solid rabbit and a print background (the grass might not stand out as much), or go all prints or all solids. You could turn your art into a small pillow too, or sew it onto the hem of a dress (wouldn’t that be super cute?!).

 

All patterns, tutorials, and photos at this blog were created/produced by Erica Daley and are copyright protected. You may use these patterns to create your own pieces for personal use, classroom use (one copy, not to be distributed to parents or throughout the school), or a limited quantity for re-sale (no more than 10 items total), but please credit “Erica Daley” when labeling them, or posting photos of them in a public format. If you want to create more than 10 items for re-sale, please contact me. DO NOT use any photos. For more information on copyright regulations, please visit: Crafts and Copyrights.

© Copyright 2017 by Erica Daley. All rights reserved.

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